We need waste management solutions

designed in and suited to local conditions

A key tool to improve waste management is to develop strong local waste management plans. Local authorities may plan targets, timelines for investments and define how the responsibilities will be carried out and financed for years ahead. A local waste management plan is adapted to local conditions including geography, demographics, economic structure, responsibilities and management of municipal solid waste. We believe that there is no “one size fits all” in waste management. We use a 7-steps ISWM approach for waste management planning and stakeholder engagement process. In this approach, the stakeholders - users and local institutions - make the decisions and choose the system that meets their needs and preferences. 

 

01

Organize the process

 

03

Create planning factors

05

Draft and validate the ISWM plan

07

Monitor the plan

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02

Find the baseline

 

04

Construct and model different scenarios 

06

Plan the implementation

INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT (ISWM)

WORK PACKAGES

How we develop and maintain

local waste management solutions

Waste management planning supported by digital network for participants to interact with experts

02

01

Training of Local Government officials for development of waste management plans​

 

03

Support program for improved waste value chains

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MOBILIZING COMMUNITIES

In Indonesia

Indonesia is the world’s second largest source of plastics to the oceans. With a population of nearly 275 million, Indonesia is generating 3,22 metric million tons (mmt) of mismanaged plastic waste per year.

 

Indonesia is also considered to be one in five countries from which more than half the ocean plastics originates, and where quick actions can have the highest impact. Addressing the problem is high on the national agenda.

 

The CLOCC project is working in Bali, and in Banyuwangi, where we’ve been building capacity in local authorities in topics essential to achieve improved and sustainable waste management. 

India is the next country CLOCC will begin working in.